A closer look at the ETFE skin of DS+R and The Rockwell Group’s Bloomberg Building

Hudson Yards, the mega-development reshaping Manhattan’s Far West Side, needs little introduction; it has been both praised and vilified for its gigantic scale and contentious urban ethos. Regardless of the controversy surrounding it, the project showcases some ambitious engineering. Designed by Diller Scofidio + Renfro (DS+R) with Rockwell Group, The Bloomberg Building’s versatile ETFE cladding and mobile shell

Exterior image of Olympic Museum construction

DS+R’s Olympic Museum rises and twists with anodized aluminum

The United States Olympic and Paralympic Museum, located in the southwest corner of downtown Colorado Springs, Colorado, is being constructed as a 60,000-square-foot curatorial and event facility celebrating American Olympians. The project, designed by New York’s Diller Scofidio + Renfro(DS+R), with architect-of-record Anderson Mason Dale, was inspired by the movement of athletes; the massing propels upward with shingled

DS+R and Rockwell Group’s The Shed opens its massive guillotine doors

Opened in April 2019, Rockwell Group and Diller Scofidio + Renfro’s (DS+R) The Shed is an eight-level, 200,000-square-foot art center located on the southern, 30th Street flank of Hudson Yards. The project has received acclaim for its operable features, notably its gliding ETFE-clad shell and multi-ton doors. Facade Manufacturer Cimolai S.p.A BGT Bischoff Glastechnik AG Bator

DS+R wraps up 15 Hudson Yards with the largest cold-warped curtainwall in North America

Diller Scofidio + Renfro (DS+R)’s first skyscraper, 15 Hudson Yards, is now complete after four years of construction. The 88-story residential tower fuses the largest cold-warped glass curtain wall in North America with a louver and limestone base. The tower is located on the southwestern flank of Hudson Yards‘s first phase located on 28 acres between 30th and

A skin for the spectacular? It has to be ETFE.

From biodomes to Disney resorts, “Sheds” and stadiums, ethylene tetrafluoroethylene, better known as ETFE, has become the material of choice for architects designing a venue for the spectacular. Appealing to designers as an affordable, translucent building skin, the material is now the go-to polymer for flamboyant facades. The Architect’s Newspaper (AN) spoke to three firms leading the