Studio Anne Holtrop’s 35 Green Corner builds texture with sand-cast concrete and aluminum

Nestled into an existing vertical garden designed by Patrick Blanc, the 35 Green Corner Building by local firm Studio Anne Holtrop makes a monolithic statement in Muharraq, Bahrain. The space, which acts as art collection storage for the Sheikh Ebrahim Center, has a very simple and shallow plan—four stories each consisting of two identical rooms

sinuous concrete form of the open terrace facing the water

The concrete Cloudscape of Haikou elevates sinuous form for coastal pavilion

The Cloudscape of Haikou opened on April 21st, 2021, welcoming users and park visitors from the coastal city of Haikou, China, to the intimate library and waystation. Commissioned by the city’s Tourism and Culture Investment Holding Group, the sinuous concrete Cloudscape is the first of 16 coastal pavilions that will be built to rejuvenate the public space along

COOKFOX’s 25 Park Row joins Lower Manhattan with fluted concrete and dramatic massing

COOKFOX Architects has been busy lately. The New York-based architecture firm has completed or is just wrapping up scores of projects across the city, ranging from twin-towered Ten Grand and One South in Williamsburg to St. John’s Terminal in Tribeca. Central to these projects is a fine-tuned understanding of context and unpretentious design cues that embed the structures within their setting.

Trahan Architects’ 309 Magazine Street infills with monumental steel and poured concrete

Architectural preservation is often a continued struggle between human-made constructs and the inexorable forces of natural phenomena. Nowhere in the United States is this relationship more pronounced than in New Orleans, that polyglottal metropolis at the border of the Mississippi River Delta and the Gulf of Mexico. Located in the Picayune Place neighborhood, Trahan Architects’ under construction 309

The Tower Renewal Partnership retrofits Southern Ontario’s concrete high-rises for a sustainable and affordable future

In the decades following World War II, countries across the globe embarked on campaigns of residential construction, and for reasons of economy and time, many reached for an off-the-shelf, modernist solution: “Towers in the park” ringing an existing urban core. Few municipalities were as gripped by this building fever as the Greater Toronto Area, which eventually amassed

Barozzi Veiga’s Tanzhaus Cultural Center borders the riverbank with tiers of concrete

The Tanzhaus Cultural Center is located on the banks of the Limmat River in the center of Zürich, Switzerland, surrounded by a diverse assemblage of historic and post-war structures of varying scales. An intervention in such a setting has the potential to both improve public lands adjacent to the riverfront and strengthen the overall streetscape, and

The Cleveland Museum of Art’s maintenance facility rises from the earth with sculpted concrete

The Cleveland Museum of Art, constructed of white Georgian marble in 1913, is a remarkable demonstration of Neoclassicism in America and serves as the lynchpin of surrounding Wade Park. Servicing the museum and the surrounding grounds requires extensive upkeep, and over the years a haphazard assembly of buildings was erected to service those needs.  These have been

COOKFOX skirts the East River with 3D-molded precast concrete panels

The waterfront surrounding Brooklyn’s former Domino Sugar Refinery continues to rise at a dizzying pace and, similar to DUMBO to the south, this spate of growth is led by Two Trees Development—ongoing projects include PAU’s reinvention of the Domino Sugar Refinery and the recently announced BIG-designed towers. Unlike other sections of the Williamsburg waterfront which are dominated by swaths glass

The Naturalis Biodiversity Center boldly stands out with red travertine and concrete

The Naturalis Biodiversity Center in Leiden, the Netherlands, houses one of the world’s largest collections of zoological specimens and geological samples—counting over half-a-million for the latter. Beginning in 2015, Rotterdam-based architectural practice Neutelings Riedijk Architects led a significant expansion of the facility to accommodate the merger of the Zoological Museum and National Herbarium into the Biodiversity Center. The

Exterior photograph of citizens bank highlighting the sawtooth windows

Elkus Manfredi’s Citizens Bank headquarters zig-zags with ultra-high-performance concrete

The Citizens Bank Corporate Campus in Johnston, Rhode Island, is not a subtle complex—it’s composed of five sprawling buildings across a 123-acre site. Designed by Boston-based architectural practice Elkus Manfredi, the project serves as a new facility to accommodate approximately 3,000 financial services employees and all five buildings are predominantly clad with ultra-high-performance concrete and low-E glass laid over zig-zagging forms.

Facade detail of alternating rising and falling panels

Studio Gang’s first residential tower in New York ripples with scalloped concrete

Since rezoning under the tenure of Michael Bloomberg, Downtown Brooklyn has undergone a tremendous transformation from a relatively low-slung commercial district to a burgeoning neighborhood defined by row upon row of residential towers. 11 Hoyt, located on the southern boundary of the district, is another addition to the area set to be completed in 2020. The tower,

Detail of 212 Stuart

Höweler + Yoon will plant fluted concrete in the center of Boston

Breaking ground later this year, 212 Stuart Street is located on the northern edge of Boston’s Bay Village Historic District between two very different contexts: a midrise commercial corridor and the 19th-century enclave of brick rowhouses. Architecture firm Höweler + Yoon was challenged with bridging these distinctive neighborhoods via a 20-story residential building that is

Detail of a vertically-striated facade panel in the Philadelphia Navy Yard

DIGSAU brings prefabricated concrete formwork to the Philadelphia Navy Yard

The Philadelphia Navy Yard, similar to other waterfront areas across the country, is undergoing a two-decades-long transformation from a declining industrial district to a burgeoning office park. A significant number of businesses have located to the adaptively reused warehouses, while others are opting for entirely new construction. 351 Rouse Street, which is the U.S Headquarters of medical

Facade detail of 30 Warren Street

Post-Office Architectes stamps Tribeca with corrugated cardboard concrete formwork

Tribeca is consistently ranked as one of the most expensive neighborhoods in New York City, so it perhaps comes as no surprise that non-landmarked lots throughout the area are being snatched up and redeveloped for commercial or residential purposes. 30 Warren Street, which is currently wrapping up construction, is located on a northeastern corner of Church